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DIY Crayon Candles: Sarah Cawood’s Step-by-Step Candle-Making Plus Top Tips for Success!

DIY Crayon Candles: Sarah Cawood’s Step-by-Step Candle-Making Plus Top Tips for Success!

Looking for a crafty way to use up all those broken, abandoned and unloved wax crayons floating around at the bottom of the kids’ craft drawers? Our fabulous Sarah Cawood has just the solution, with this colourful candle-making project! Check out her step-by-step DIY crayon candles below, and discover her top tips for candle-making success!

I’m always looking for ways to re-use and recycle these days, as I’m so painfully aware of all the rubbish that we put in landfill. When you have children, you add so many more layers to your waste, so anything I can do to prevent mindless waste is OK by me!

My kids are now six and four, and the eldest in particular, is all about writing, drawing and colouring. He’s had wax crayons since he was really little, but now that he’s old enough to use felt tips responsibly, that’s all he wants to do; not even the beautiful set of coloured pencils his grandma bought him for his birthday gets a look in. Therefore, we’ve had some lovely wax crayons lurking around the place for aeons that never get used. I saw online somewhere that wax crayons could be melted down and made into candles, and since I am a candle FREAK, I thought that this must be the craft project for me!

I have a few candle making bits and pieces in my kit, but you’ll need:

  • Long wicks with metal discs at the bottom to stick to your glass
  • Superglue, to do the sticking
  • Glasses: a small juice glass is ideal (mine were too big)
  • Metal wick holders (although you can improvise with a long wooden skewer, tying and tethering the wick to the skewer using some cotton)
  • A pan and a jug that fits over the top to melt the wax (obviously you put water in the pan underneath: don’t let it boil dry)
  • Old wax crayons with any packaging removed.
  • Essential oils (optional)

I actually ended up having a few disasters along the way, and the finished article is by no means my best work, but  at least I can tell you the things that I think I did wrong, so that you can learn from my mistakes!

Firstly, I mixed in some old candle dregs that I had saved from my previous candle-making adventures (I like making teacup candles too!). It’s a great way to use up the ends of candles, and if they’re posh scented ones, then all the better!

However, for wax crayons candles, I think it’s best not to mix any other kind of wax in with them, as I ended up with some separation which made the finished article look less than professional.

Secondly, I am an impatient crafter: THE VERY WORST KIND OF CRAFTER THERE IS!

I simply cannot wait to see how things are going to turn out, but when making these candles, I really think it best to leave the wax to harden for as long as you can between pours…

It does mean that it can take days to finish them, but if you maybe do one pour a day in each votive glass, they should be good and hard ready for consecutive layers.

Oh, and I think the glasses I used were too big too… I think the effect would have been more dramatic and easier to create in smaller glasses; wax crayons don’t melt down to much!

I finished with one final pour of some white soy wax that I had in my craft kit from previous candle-making adventures, and I’m hoping that it covers all my mishaps. I also fragranced that last pour with some grapefruit essential oil so that when they first burn, it should be a nice refreshing hit. Again, the soy wax was not ideal as it wasn’t really compatible with the crayon wax, but I had to do some damage limitation and it was my only option!

 

Here’s how they turned out. Only one of them would be decent enough for a gift, but I guess I’ve saved myself some pennies by not having to buy new candles for a little while!

Looking for more crafty ways to keep busy this summer? Stock up on supplies at Create and Craft!



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